Ways that gardening is good for your health

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With summer finally here, we cannot think of a better way to celebrate the arrival of warmer weather than to encourage you to get out into your garden.

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In the following guide, The Plastic People — a manufacturer of various products which are ideal for enhancing both your home and garden — looks into how gardening can help improve your health and wellbeing:

Gardening has been found to ease stress

Gardening can reduce stress more than other relaxing leisure activities, according to the findings of a study titled Gardening Promotes Neuroendocrine and Affective Restoration from Stress.

For the research, those taking part were initially asked to complete a task aimed at making them stressed. Following this, the individuals were split into two groups — one group was instructed to read indoors for 30 minutes and the other group was assigned gardening tasks for the same period of time.

When the half an hour was up, the people who had done some gardening were reported to have felt in a better mood and were identified as having lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

Gardening has been found to improve mental health

Research carried out by gardening company Bakker Spalding has claimed that gardening can have positive effects on a person’s mental health as well as their physical wellbeing.

Upon surveying a group of people, 88 per cent said that a key benefit for them spending time in the garden is due to the mental wellbeing that such an activity brings them.

Kathryn Rossiter, the CEO of leading disability and gardening charity Thrive, acknowledged the value of gardening on health in an interview to The Telegraph: “As well as the strong therapeutic value of gardening, it can help people connect with others, reducing feelings of isolation. It makes us more active, gaining both physical and mental health benefits.”

Gardening has been found to reduce the risk of a heart attack or stroke

In a 12-year study reported on by The Guardian, it was found that regular gardening or DIY can reduce the chance of someone in the 60-plus age bracket suffering a heart attack or stroke, as well as prolong life, by as much as 30 per cent.

The research, led by Dr Elin Ekblom-Bak at Karolinska University hospital’s department of medicine and involving close to 4,000 60-year-olds based in Stockholm, involved people initially asked questions about their diet, lifestyle and inclusion in physical activity. Lab tests and physical examinations were also conducted, with those identified as having an active daily life been much less at risk of having a heart attack than others involved in the study.

Regular activity was seen as offering more benefits throughout the course of the 12-year study, such as reducing the risk of individuals experiencing cardiovascular problems.


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