Tonsilopharyngitis with Exudation

Inflammation of the tonsils is caused by viral or bacterial infection as a common cold virus usually being the culprit. Our tonsils are the first line of defense, under normal condition as viruses and bacteria enter the body through the nose and mouth; they are filtered in the tonsils.
Children and adults can have infected tonsils, as most types of this disease are contagious, spreading from one person to another by contact with the throat or nasal fluids of someone who is infected.



My eldest son recently has suffered from Tonsillopharyngitis with exudation.  It is an acute infection of both the pharynx and palatine tonsils. Symptoms in him include:
  • sore throat
  • dysphagia, painful or difficult swallowing
  • coughs
  • high grade fever
  • muscle pain
  • white or yellow patches on the tonsils
  • muffled voice
His clinical diagnosis upon seen by an EENT specialist was Tonsilopharyngitis with exudation. His tonsils are swollen and red having purulent exudation. His treatment involves antibiotics, antiseptic for mouth wash, paracetamol for fever, vitamins and oresol to rehydrate. The doctor told us if it was untreated it may lead to local suppurative complications (eg, peritonsillar abscess or cellulitis) and sometimes to rheumatic fever or glomerulonephritis. The doctor also assured us, as long as there will be no other complication to arise, it will resolve within 7 days upon continued medication.
Aside from the religious intake of prescribed medicines.  Soft diet is given to him, lots of fluids and fruits. He needs plenty of nourishment and rest.
The EENT doctor advised us thatTonsillectomy should be considered if group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) tonsillitis recurs repeatedly, that is more than 6 episodes per year, or more than 4 episodes per year for 2 years, or if acute infection is severe and persistent despite antibiotics.
As of this writing my son is already well, no more fever, no more throat pain and can eat a normal meal. He also had finished his seven days antibiotics treatment. He’s now fit and ready to get back to work.